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SparkNotes: Keats’s Odes: Ode on a Grecian Urn

This is because the poem has two separate levels. Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn has a superficial level of happiness and joy, which acts as a facade for a deeper level of morbidity and death, most likely because of the fact that Keats was dying as he wrote this poem. First of all, when one starts to read this poem, one cannot help but think that the tone is one of happiness. In fact, in the third stanza, Keats uses the word happy five times. The language of the poem is very flowery and beautiful, and it has the effect of lightening the deeper mood of the poem. For example, in the line "A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme:" (Keats, line 4), Keats is talking about the tale told by the urn. He is disguising it as sweet and flowery when, in reality, it is dark

Sample  topic, essay writing: Ode On A Grecian Urn - Critical Analysis - 638 words

The reason he wants to present this idea is because he is dying and he knows it. Therefore, Ode on a Grecian Urn is not happy, as it seems. The deep, underlying meaning is death.

A summary of Ode on a Grecian Urn in John Keats's ..

The second structure Keats uses in his poems is personification, which can mostly be seen in “Ode on a Grecian Urn.” The use of personification in this poem can be seen when the poem states, “Sylvan historian, who canst thus express.” (Keats, Ode to a Grecian Urn, page 891, line 3) In these lines Keats is comparing the urn to a historian because of the ancient art work that covers the side of the urn.

“What are we to make of the tonal perplexity with which Ode on a Grecian Urn… begins…- since the performance of ekphrasis is supposed to exude a speaker’s confidence for the task?” (Kelley 172) Here, Theresa M.

in "Ode on a Grecian Urn", ..

I have looked at

"More happy love! more happy, happy love!" (Keats, line 25). When one reads lines such as this, one cannot help but think that the must have been very, very happy, and that, in fact, the tone of the poem is light and filled with joy. However, this is not the case in John Keats's poem, Ode on a Grecian Urn. At first glance, the tone of the poem seems light and flowery. However, when one looks deeper into the poem to find its underlying meanings, one discovers that the tone of the poem is very morbid.

Ode on a Grecian Urn was written only about two years before his death. In this poem he discusses immortality and things frozen forever in a state of perfection, such as the urn. It seems he is longing for the immortality that is possessed by the urn. He knows he can never have this immortality. At first glance, John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn presents images of happiness through its flowery language and imagery. However, when one examines this poem more closely, one discovers that the deeper meaning of the poem is one of sorrow and death. Keats uses his flowery language as a facade for his deeper meaning.

Keats has the same motivation in
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Ode on a Grecian Urn - Critical Analysis; John Keating;

"Cp. the death of Camilla in Aeneid xi 768-82, 801-6, during the crucial battle between Aeneas and Turnus: Forte sacer Cybele Chloreus olimque sacerdos / insignis longe Phrygiis fulgebat in armis / spumantemque agitabat equum, quem pellis aenis / in plumam squamis auro conserta tegebat. / ipse peregrina ferrugine clarus et ostro / spicula torquebat Lycio Gortynia cornu; / aureus ex umeris erat arcus et aurea vati / cassida; tum croceam chlamydemque sinusque crepantis / carbaseos fulvo in nodum collegerat auro, / pictus acu tunicas et barbara tegmina crurum. / hunc virgo, sive ut templis praefigeret arma / Troia, captivo sive ut se ferret in auro, / venatrix unum ex omni certamine pugnae / caeca sequebatur totumque incauta per agmen / femineo praedae et spoliorum ardebat amore ... / ... nihil ipsa nec aurae / nec sonitus memor aut venientis ab aethere teli, / hasta sub exsertam donec perlata papillam / haesit, virgineumque alte bibit acta cruorem. / concurrunt trepidae comites dominamque ruentem / suscipiunt. (It chanced that Chloreus, sacred to Cybelus, and once a priest, glittered resplendent afar in Phrygian armour, and spurred his foaming charger, whose covering was a skin, plumed with brazen scales and clasped with gold. Himself ablaze in the deep hue of foreign purple, he launched Gortynian shafts from Lycian bow: golden was that bow upon his shoulders, and golden was the seer's helmet; his saffron scarf and its rustling linen folds were gathered into a knot by yellow gold; embroidered with the needle were his tunic and barbaric hose. Him, whether in hope to fasten on temple-gate Trojan arms, or to flaunt herself in golden spoil, the maiden, singling out from all the battle fray, blindly pursued in huntress fashion, and recklessly raged through all the ranks with a woman's passion for booty and for spoil. ... She herself, neither of air, nor of sound, nor of weapon coming from the sky recked aught, till the spear, borne home, beneath the bare breast found lodging, and, driven deep, drank her maiden blood. In alarm, her comrades hurry around her, and catch their falling queen.) Addison had retold this episode in Spectator No. 15, in which his theme was the 'unaccountable Humour in Woman-kind, of being smitten with every thing that is showy and superficial; and ... the numberless Evils that befall the Sex, from this light, fantastical Disposition.' The moral he drew from Camilla's fate is close to that of G[ray].'s Ode. See ll. 37-42 n."

Critical Appreciation Of Ode To Grecian Urn Free Essays

"Cp. the death of Camilla in Aeneid xi 768-82, 801-6, during the crucial battle between Aeneas and Turnus: Forte sacer Cybele Chloreus olimque sacerdos / insignis longe Phrygiis fulgebat in armis / spumantemque agitabat equum, quem pellis aenis / in plumam squamis auro conserta tegebat. / ipse peregrina ferrugine clarus et ostro / spicula torquebat Lycio Gortynia cornu; / aureus ex umeris erat arcus et aurea vati / cassida; tum croceam chlamydemque sinusque crepantis / carbaseos fulvo in nodum collegerat auro, / pictus acu tunicas et barbara tegmina crurum. / hunc virgo, sive ut templis praefigeret arma / Troia, captivo sive ut se ferret in auro, / venatrix unum ex omni certamine pugnae / caeca sequebatur totumque incauta per agmen / femineo praedae et spoliorum ardebat amore ... / ... nihil ipsa nec aurae / nec sonitus memor aut venientis ab aethere teli, / hasta sub exsertam donec perlata papillam / haesit, virgineumque alte bibit acta cruorem. / concurrunt trepidae comites dominamque ruentem / suscipiunt. (It chanced that Chloreus, sacred to Cybelus, and once a priest, glittered resplendent afar in Phrygian armour, and spurred his foaming charger, whose covering was a skin, plumed with brazen scales and clasped with gold. Himself ablaze in the deep hue of foreign purple, he launched Gortynian shafts from Lycian bow: golden was that bow upon his shoulders, and golden was the seer's helmet; his saffron scarf and its rustling linen folds were gathered into a knot by yellow gold; embroidered with the needle were his tunic and barbaric hose. Him, whether in hope to fasten on temple-gate Trojan arms, or to flaunt herself in golden spoil, the maiden, singling out from all the battle fray, blindly pursued in huntress fashion, and recklessly raged through all the ranks with a woman's passion for booty and for spoil. ... She herself, neither of air, nor of sound, nor of weapon coming from the sky recked aught, till the spear, borne home, beneath the bare breast found lodging, and, driven deep, drank her maiden blood. In alarm, her comrades hurry around her, and catch their falling queen.) Addison had retold this episode in Spectator No. 15, in which his theme was the 'unaccountable Humour in Woman-kind, of being smitten with every thing that is showy and superficial; and ... the numberless Evils that befall the Sex, from this light, fantastical Disposition.' The moral he drew from Camilla's fate is close to that of G[ray].'s Ode. See ll. 37-42 n."

Critical Appreciation Of Ode To Grecian Urn

"Cp. the death of Camilla in Aeneid xi 768-82, 801-6, during the crucial battle between Aeneas and Turnus: Forte sacer Cybele Chloreus olimque sacerdos / insignis longe Phrygiis fulgebat in armis / spumantemque agitabat equum, quem pellis aenis / in plumam squamis auro conserta tegebat. / ipse peregrina ferrugine clarus et ostro / spicula torquebat Lycio Gortynia cornu; / aureus ex umeris erat arcus et aurea vati / cassida; tum croceam chlamydemque sinusque crepantis / carbaseos fulvo in nodum collegerat auro, / pictus acu tunicas et barbara tegmina crurum. / hunc virgo, sive ut templis praefigeret arma / Troia, captivo sive ut se ferret in auro, / venatrix unum ex omni certamine pugnae / caeca sequebatur totumque incauta per agmen / femineo praedae et spoliorum ardebat amore ... / ... nihil ipsa nec aurae / nec sonitus memor aut venientis ab aethere teli, / hasta sub exsertam donec perlata papillam / haesit, virgineumque alte bibit acta cruorem. / concurrunt trepidae comites dominamque ruentem / suscipiunt. (It chanced that Chloreus, sacred to Cybelus, and once a priest, glittered resplendent afar in Phrygian armour, and spurred his foaming charger, whose covering was a skin, plumed with brazen scales and clasped with gold. Himself ablaze in the deep hue of foreign purple, he launched Gortynian shafts from Lycian bow: golden was that bow upon his shoulders, and golden was the seer's helmet; his saffron scarf and its rustling linen folds were gathered into a knot by yellow gold; embroidered with the needle were his tunic and barbaric hose. Him, whether in hope to fasten on temple-gate Trojan arms, or to flaunt herself in golden spoil, the maiden, singling out from all the battle fray, blindly pursued in huntress fashion, and recklessly raged through all the ranks with a woman's passion for booty and for spoil. ... She herself, neither of air, nor of sound, nor of weapon coming from the sky recked aught, till the spear, borne home, beneath the bare breast found lodging, and, driven deep, drank her maiden blood. In alarm, her comrades hurry around her, and catch their falling queen.) Addison had retold this episode in Spectator No. 15, in which his theme was the 'unaccountable Humour in Woman-kind, of being smitten with every thing that is showy and superficial; and ... the numberless Evils that befall the Sex, from this light, fantastical Disposition.' The moral he drew from Camilla's fate is close to that of G[ray].'s Ode. See ll. 37-42 n."

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